5 sweets that you should make at home this Holi

ghewar
SHARE

Festival of Colours Holi, though mainly celebrated in some parts of India, has spread it's contagious fun to other parts of Asia and the world. Known for it's colourful and energetic celebrations, Holi also brings a string of culinary delights, specific to the regions it is celebrated in.

Gujiya, in particular, is very typical of Holi and is rarely prepared during any other time of the year. Here are five recipes of sweets that you can try at home and add flavours to your Holi celebrations.

Dudhi Halwa

'Dudhi' or 'lauki' or bottle gourd makes for a textured halwa, very different from the Kerala halwa. You can replace bottle gourd with olan and prepare this rich dessert.

Read recipe here

Malpua

Malpua is an all-rounder – it can be served as a dessert, snack or even breakfast. It looks much similar to south Indian snack Neyyappam. They are easily made for special occasions, often paired with rabri or milk cream.

Read recipe here

Ghewar

It's crunchy and light yet syrupy, and is usually topped with a liberal spread of malai (milk cream)! Heard enough to take that leap of faith, haven't you? The tradition of Rajasthan cuisine holds close to its heart, and with pride, the Ghewar.

Read recipe here

Gujiya

Gujiya is a sweet fried dumpling dish which is the queen of Holi. The filling of gujiya varies from home to home and we believe in richer the better! So here is a simple but delicious recipe for gujiya.

Read recipe here

Bread rasmalai

Rasmalai is basically chenna or cottage cheese dipped in rabri. The malai discs are made using curdled milk. Anyway, you can minimize the effort by using white bread and condensed milk to make rich and creamy malai.

Read recipe here

MORE IN IN SEASON
SHOW MORE